Stations of the Cross

Stations of the Cross

Because Stations of the Cross traditionally involve moving around, it may not be the first thing we think of for a chapel service. But Teresa (Cathedral Grammar) enjoyed doing it in a primary school chapel last year, and has recommended a resource you can find here.

The potential for Stations in schools is huge! Ask art teachers to plan a project whereby paintings or sculptures for each station are made and put up around the school. Or make Lent a time for setting a room or portion of the school hall aside for Prayer Stations, following the Stations of the Cross. At Hadlow, Philippa utilised the little backstage part of their hall and it made a wonderful quiet area for students to use. It felt a little like a secret cubby house, the sort you make with blankets over chairs and tables, and the students loved it.

Loyola Press have a simple multimedia presentation of each station: a powerpoint slide with music behind. Find it here .

For older students, each of the paintings in this set of Stations could lead to discussions about situations around the world. This set puts Jesus in situations of modern-day conflict.

What other resources have you found or made?

Search

Advent Resources

September may seem early to be thinking of Advent, but once Term 4 starts it…

Read More

Lament

There will be times in every school life when lament is the right and appropriate…

Read More

The Golden Rule

One verse in the Bible which is still widely known (even if it is often…

Read More

Beauty will Save the World.

Our Office has had a long connection with the Anglican Schools’ Office in Brisbane Diocese,…

Read More

Matariki

Matariki is coming up on July 13th, 2020. There are heaps of excellent resources on…

Read More

Thanksgiving and Remembrance

At the centre of our Gospel is the news that death has been conquered, that…

Read More